Sara Bareilles, SESAC, and Decision Making

I’ve wanted to blog for a few days, but I’ve been distracted by a flurry of issues involving my car/driver’s license/house/mold situation. UGH….

On Monday night, I went to the Sugarland concert. Sara Bareilles was opening and as I looked at her band, I was shocked to see that I knew the bass player, Daniel Rhine. He and I had played a few times at Point Loma Nazarene University’s church when I was in college.  I think I remember him getting the gig, but had forgotten since it’s been a few years. After she finished, I went down to get a funnel cake and some lemonade (Which are all on my diet… btw…) And I saw Daniel walking from the stage with his friends or family. I was like, “Hey Daniel, I’m Josh Damigo, we played together in San Diego…”

Daniel was so kind and I couldn’t shake his hand or anything cause I was literally jumbling all the food, but it was so good to see another one of the people I’ve encountered in the past “making” it. The theatre was amazing, and the show was awesome, but seeing a friend be able to play for that crowd was the best part of the whole experience.

Today I’m at the SESAC conference in LA. I love how much of a family atmosphere there is here. I think that the peeps at SESAC are some of the only friends I have in town sometimes. I have honestly had a tough time making friends, or finding legit contacts in LA because a lot of people promise things, but then don’t follow through. I’ve been offered record contracts/promotion deals/endorsements and the next thing I know, I’ve been put on the backburner, they don’t take my calls, and they quit trying to hang out. I just don’t need that anymore. I need results. So it’s nothing personal, it’s simply just moving on to people that can get things done on the budget that I have, and not trying to milk my 8 dollar an hour paycheck from my part-time day job. 😛 I’ve been in LA for 8 months now, and many of the things I had hoped for haven’t even been started, so I’m learning that until I have money to make things happen, I have to keep moving forward with the opportunities I have.

Don't you wish it was this easy??? 😦

Decision making is tough. When you get an opportunity, and you don’t have a ton of time to decide what to do, how do you choose? One person told me, “Go with your gut.” But what do you do when your gut is turning in 2 different ways? Another person said, “Things are clearer in the morning.” But what happens when you wake up, and you still can’t choose?

I don’t know if I have an answer for my own question. I guess you just make a decision and see where it leads. You can think on it, pray about it, ask you friends for advice, but ultimately, you have to do what you have to do, and whatever reasoning you use, it’s ultimately your own decision.

That may seem cryptic, and that’s my bad… I think it’s just that I’m looking for someone else to tell me what to do sometimes. This last year has been so incredibly difficult in figuring out what to do, and “Faking it till I’m Making it”, that I’m exhausted and need help. If you can give me to a music supervisor, introduce me to a friend, sign me to a record label, give me a publishing deal, then I’m here and ready for a hug. 😛

 

Advertisements

About Joshua Lodge

Josh will cheerfully admit that he averaged less than a dozen people a show when he first began playing San Diego coffee houses and clubs. But he garnered diehard fans in the process, sold a few thousand copies of his EP, Pocket Change, and picked up few awards along the way. After a traumatic family incident Josh retreated inward, and he ended up writing what would ultimately become his breakout debut, Raw. The album was true to its name and people noticed - Josh picked up two San Diego Music Awards for "Best Acoustic" and "Best Local Recording," opened for the likes of Zac Brown, Jason Mraz, and Matt Nathanson, and had enough money and momentum to tour the country a few times over. A few years after Raw, there was his third EP, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Josh spent much of the year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his album I Will Be There out now on Randm Records. From the joyous encouragement of “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all. A few years after Raw, there was his third release, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Damigo spent much of year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his latest album, "Just Give Me a Call", available now, on Randm Records. From the up-tempo single, “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Sara Bareilles, SESAC, and Decision Making

  1. Nancy Keller says:

    Josh, when you were here in Phoenix and made the statement that people are just for themselves, I thought about that and I think I have to agree with you. I know it’s hard for you because, no matter what you told us, I know you are a wonderful person that wants to help other people and you do not think of yourself first. It is hard, but I think you’ve hit the part of the road where Josh is going to have to think of Josh first. I know you want these people to be as kind to you as you are to them, but in this day and age, it’s just not happening. Be there for yourself first Josh (I should talk, but I’m learning) and then help others with what’s left over. I hope things get better and I’m sending a hug to you. Nancy

  2. Christy Larson says:

    I have learned so many valuable lessons over the past two years that I could start anywhere and keep talking for hours, but one thing I am completely over is HYPE. There have just been too many instances since moving to Southern CA where people are just all talk, and swept up in emotion. I love San Diego and have no intention of leaving, but I have learned that empty promises are part of the culture and my outlook has become, “it all sounds nice but I’ll believe it when I see it.” I have to keep that perspective with everyone. All the promises you hear, all the nice-sounding words, don’t mean shit til you actually see it. I don’t hold my breath for people, I don’t change my schedule with high hopes, and I don’t lose my drive, because as far as everyone else is concerned, I’ll believe it when I see it.

  3. a friend says:

    The only way to do things is to get two jobs, make a little nest egg, and tour tour tour. This way you don’t rely on anybody’s empty promises. You cant sit around waiting for other people to make your dreams happen. You make your dreams happen.

  4. Deane Ogden says:

    Hey bro,

    I had NO idea you were in LA now. I would love to get together, have some grub, and catch up. Maybe we can help each other. I’ve been here for 11 years and know a lot of the “good seeds” that we both would probably rather deal with, rather than the “douches” that neither of would ever want to deal with. Anyway, let’s chat. Email me your digits. My email addy is at my website. I’d love to hang. \m/

    DO

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s