9/11 to Me

“One of the most difficult things everyone has to learn is that for your entire life you must keep fighting and adjusting if you hope to survive. No matter who you are or what your position is you must keep fighting for whatever it is you desire to achieve.” -George Allen (American football Coach. Noted for his hard-driving work ethic. 1922-1990)

Some nights you don’t feel like going on stage. All you can think about is a situation, a problem, an insecurity… You feel tired- like you’re not good enough- like you’re nothing but a failure. You feel like you’ve stumbled so many times, and things have been so hard for you don’t know how long, that you don’t know how you’re gonna get up on a stage. It feels like most of the people will be talking over your art, not caring that you’re there, or criticizing your every move.

Tonight’s one of those nights.

I told Jeff Berkley earlier this week that the September 11 remembrance stuff was getting to me. 10 years ago, I was at home watching TV when I saw the second plane fly into the second tower. I remember looking at my little brother, and could see that he was visibly upset. I didn’t understand it then, but now it’s a lot tougher. Two years after the attacks on 9/11, my brother would join the Marines and four years after that, he’d battle with PTSD and 4 years after that, I’d be sitting here posting this blog. It almost feels like when the attacks happened, my life just started. I don’t really remember the feeling of “carefree” or that of naivety, I just remember watching my back from that day forward.

I’m gonna go listen to some music, and maybe play some guitar to get ready for the show tonight, but everything inside of me just wants to smoosh my face in a pillow. I miss my brother, and I miss feeling invincible. Things/Times/Life will get better.

I heard a story on KOGO this week about a guy who’s daughter was on one of the planes that crashed into the twin towers. She was going to Boston College, and had a full life taken away because terrorists hated us so much that they decided to attack. Their religion and entire lives were dedicated to inflicting harm on us because of our culture. It’s hard for me to fathom the amount of brainwashing it takes to convince someone to do something like this. And it really bothers me that people like this can be anywhere at any time.

Please thank our troops, pray for our troops, remember those innocent lives we lost, and pray for a safe remembrance day.

-j

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About Joshua Lodge

Josh will cheerfully admit that he averaged less than a dozen people a show when he first began playing San Diego coffee houses and clubs. But he garnered diehard fans in the process, sold a few thousand copies of his EP, Pocket Change, and picked up few awards along the way. After a traumatic family incident Josh retreated inward, and he ended up writing what would ultimately become his breakout debut, Raw. The album was true to its name and people noticed - Josh picked up two San Diego Music Awards for "Best Acoustic" and "Best Local Recording," opened for the likes of Zac Brown, Jason Mraz, and Matt Nathanson, and had enough money and momentum to tour the country a few times over. A few years after Raw, there was his third EP, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Josh spent much of the year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his album I Will Be There out now on Randm Records. From the joyous encouragement of “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all. A few years after Raw, there was his third release, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Damigo spent much of year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his latest album, "Just Give Me a Call", available now, on Randm Records. From the up-tempo single, “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all.
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2 Responses to 9/11 to Me

  1. Lina says:

    Stay strong, Josh! There will be days when life will feel perfect. Take this moment to reflect on something positive, and then go and have a killer show! Your songs will bring joy to those who will be listening!!! Truth!

  2. Cori says:

    My heart is with you, Nathan and everyone else who was affected by this horrific tragedy. Thank you for your innermost thoughts and memories of that day. Know that you are not alone with the heaviness in your heart today.

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