There’s No Place Like Lestat’s (Home)

(thanks to sddialedin.com for the photo!!!)

Tonight’s show wasn’t sold out, but it was all that I needed to feel at home. You have no clue how good it feels to play Lestat’s every month. I have a hard time describing how great Lou and Lestat’s are, but I’m gonna try. When I first started music, I’d play every week at Lestat’s. I’d sit through the selection, hoping to get picked. Then stress out about what two songs I’d play. I’d shake hands, tell jokes, and secretly be so scared of getting on stage. Every week, the guitar pops would leave you deaf from the “newbies” unplugging their guitars, and that comics trying really hard to be funny without cussing. Guys like Midget Farmer, Wolf, and other “real life- Second Lifers” would get up on stage and try to entertain. I remember meeting Jesse Johnson, Thinking Rob Deez was a russian comic and watching Mal Hall tell his first few jokes. I watched more seasoned vets play like Isaac Cheong, John Hull, Kyle Phelan, Lisa Sanders, Aaron Bowen, Greg Laswell, Gregory Page, Molly Jenson, Anya Marina, Anna Troy, and Robin Henkel. I remember the first time that I met Lou, and how we sat outside and talked about playing show. I remember the banners I used to make for myspace about those shows, and trying to name my backing band. We ended up calling Eric Yocom and Kory McAfee “The Pickpockets”. I remember Dr. Dave coming up and playing a show with us, promoting for a full month, and only having 4 people show up. (They got in for free, cause nobody wanted to pay the cover…) I remember playing shows with bigger acts like Bushwalla, Ari Hest, Tyler Hilton, Thomas Ian Nicholas, Chris Ayer, Chris Pureka, Tony Lucca, Ernie Halter, Curtis Peoples, Anjulie, and many, many others.
For all of these things, there is one “constant.” And his name is Louis Brazier. Lou has been my friend since day one. We’ve played basketball together. Figured out how to echo my voice perfectly during pocket change, and sat around just chitchatting during the day. We’ve gone through everything together and there’s nothing that we can’t talk about together, there’s nothing that I probably haven’t said to him. 😛
I remember winning my first San Diego Music Award, and getting sooo much trash from Lou for not thanking him and Lestat’s. 😀 I remember him giving me a hard time for not mentioning Lestat’s in publications, and telling everyone I wanted to play at Croce’s during my first TV interview, when I definitely don’t play jazz. He’s been my best friend, and he’s been the hardest person to get a hold of, and everything in between.

Lou, you’re the older brother I always wanted and nothing I’ve ever done or will eventually do would have been possible if it wasn’t for you. I love you, buddy.

I hope to see you all next month (October 15th) for my show with B. Willing James and Justine Bennett. Thank you so much for all the love and support, and for making tonight’s show with Savannah Philyaw and Omar Velasco so incredibly special.

-j

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About Joshua Lodge

Josh will cheerfully admit that he averaged less than a dozen people a show when he first began playing San Diego coffee houses and clubs. But he garnered diehard fans in the process, sold a few thousand copies of his EP, Pocket Change, and picked up few awards along the way. After a traumatic family incident Josh retreated inward, and he ended up writing what would ultimately become his breakout debut, Raw. The album was true to its name and people noticed - Josh picked up two San Diego Music Awards for "Best Acoustic" and "Best Local Recording," opened for the likes of Zac Brown, Jason Mraz, and Matt Nathanson, and had enough money and momentum to tour the country a few times over. A few years after Raw, there was his third EP, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Josh spent much of the year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his album I Will Be There out now on Randm Records. From the joyous encouragement of “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all. A few years after Raw, there was his third release, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Damigo spent much of year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his latest album, "Just Give Me a Call", available now, on Randm Records. From the up-tempo single, “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all.
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