Albuquerque and Running Out of Gas

Albuquerque is fun to say. I don’t like typing it that much though. Either way, it’s definitely a fun stop on tour. I played a really cool gig with Daniel Park at Zinc Cellar Bar. Super great vibe in the room and the staff was awesome! (And gorgeous… Sheesh…)

Good to see people for the first time and others again! Thanks so much for coming out! Forgive me if I look cranky. It’s called a beard, and I’ll get rid of it soon. 😛

So Daniel’s been playing for a year or two and is really a talented player. Classically trained on violin, and it obviously carried over to guitar. Extremely clever with his loops and the kind of guy who can work any room between sets. I can see him going far.

He asked me a question that I’ve been asking myself for the last few years. It was, “What more should I be doing?” Hmmmmm….

Here’s a practical example from the tour. I’m wicked anxious to get to Tucson right now cause my best friend Trevor lives there and I’m gonna try to talk him into getting tattoos. (Not sure if he knows this yet or not…) I took off from ABQ and about 20 miles outside of town, I saw my gas light come on. “Shoot!” I thought, as I drove another 5 miles before I could turn around and drive 18 miles back, get gas and start over.

You see, sometimes it feels like that when it comes to music. You inch forward only to realize that you need to fill up again, and you go back to go forward. Moving to LA was HUGE for me. But it wasn’t easy. I got to see what they were doing in the music industry, and figure out how I could emulate that in my career. Some people thought I was throwing all the work I had done in San Diego, but at the same time, I played in SD 2-3 times a month and many people didn’t even know I moved!

So did I move ahead by doing that? Did I take a side step? Go back? The truth is that I think music is like the earth and the Sun. If your career is the sun and it’s moving in a certain direction, you are actually the earth and moving around your career. Some days, you are out in front of your career, doing things that will affect you in the future. Sometimes, you feel like you’re behind your career, and it’s still pulling you forward but you are unmotivated, or feeling stagnant. This constant movement is never ending, but the more you do, the better it will be in the end. The force you move at will ultimately affect your career, and once you get it moving, it will move itself.

But it takes time. You have to invest a ton of time to get it going. The whole “American Idol” type of fame is not the kind that will last. Some of the artists will be famous for a while, but a majority of them disappear for a long time, and they don’t get to call their own shots/enjoy the ride.

That’s really what it boils down to. At the end of the day, when you’ve made 18 bucks after a 4 hour gig, and you’re driving to the next city, you have to stop and laugh, cause this is what singer/songwriters do! You’re already “doing” it!

So keep working. Keep fighting. And keep living. 😀

Be Foolish. Be Hungry.
-j

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About Joshua Lodge

Josh will cheerfully admit that he averaged less than a dozen people a show when he first began playing San Diego coffee houses and clubs. But he garnered diehard fans in the process, sold a few thousand copies of his EP, Pocket Change, and picked up few awards along the way. After a traumatic family incident Josh retreated inward, and he ended up writing what would ultimately become his breakout debut, Raw. The album was true to its name and people noticed - Josh picked up two San Diego Music Awards for "Best Acoustic" and "Best Local Recording," opened for the likes of Zac Brown, Jason Mraz, and Matt Nathanson, and had enough money and momentum to tour the country a few times over. A few years after Raw, there was his third EP, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Josh spent much of the year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his album I Will Be There out now on Randm Records. From the joyous encouragement of “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all. A few years after Raw, there was his third release, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Damigo spent much of year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his latest album, "Just Give Me a Call", available now, on Randm Records. From the up-tempo single, “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all.
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