Goodbye, Josh Damigo

There’s never a good way to say, “Goodbye”. Songs are written about how hard it is. Stories end, and people leave their trash in the theatre. There is literally hardly anything “good” about “goodbye”. After over 10 years, and hundreds of shows, this is one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do.

With that said… “Goodbye, Josh Damigo.”

Here’s why.

A lifetime ago, my brother, committed a crime while drunk and dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Survivor’s Remorse. He then spent the next seven years in jail, a mental hospital, halfway home, and eventually, prison. Was any of this right or fair? I don’t think so. Is it right for our troops to come home after serving our country and not care for them? No. Is it right to commit a crime and expect to not have any punishment for that crime? No. Do I think what he received is what he deserved? No.

During that time that my brother was in prison, he got tied up in the wrong crowd… possibly the only crowd available to him. He started writing letters and saying things that you wouldn’t hear, normally. “Hitler wasn’t all that bad…” or “Jews made up a lot of things…” are things I would have never expected to hear from my little brother. I heard about the racist literature he was reading, and where these statements were coming from, and begged him to look at both sides of the issues. I failed.

I was raised to love others. I was raised with Christian values and still hold my faith, dearly. I believe in grace and that Christ’s blood is sufficient for my sins. I believe that we should treat others the way that Christ taught us, regardless of faith, nationality, sexual orientation, wealth, etc… and I believe that it is not my job to walk around like a Christian police officer or judge others, but to do my best to show love to everyone that I meet and in every situation possible.

Unfortunately, my brother’s choices and stance on all of this is completely different from mine. Through those choices, he has aligned himself with the likes of David Duke, Richard Spencer, and other white nationalists. He regularly preaches separation, and takes part in hate speech. He blogs, interviews, and has become a public figure within an organization that stands for all of the things that I have done everything in my power to live against.

I knew what he stood for and he knew what I stood for. I had hoped and still hope that he would grow out of, but it is pretty obvious that it’s only becoming more and more rooted in everything that he is.

I’ve decided that I no longer want to be associated with that name. It’s time for a new one.

There’s obviously a lot of opinions, and I’ve thought about them and weighed them, and it’s been the hardest thing that I’ve been through, other than seeing my brother in jail. Do I stick with a “name” that I’ve used all over San Diego and occasionally in a few cities on tour, or do I move on, grow up, end this chapter, and start something new?

My answer: “Goodbye, Josh Damigo”.

But there’s a funny thing about “goodbye”. It allows you to say, “Hello”.

So, Goodbye, Josh Damigo… Hello, Joshua Lodge. I’ll be working on writing new music, and I don’t have a release date or any plans with it, just yet. I’ve just decided and know that this is my next step… my next chapter. I honestly hope that you will come with me.

For anyone who has any questions, feel free to reach out. Please understand that this has been emotional, and It’s not something I want to spend my life talking about. It’s why I haven’t felt like playing many shows and why a lot of people have asked where I’ve been. It’s been the source of my depression, and a lot of tears.

Thank you for your understanding. Thank you for your love. I have tried to write this over and over again. It’s not the most poetic. It’s not the most heroic. But it is the end of something special and beginning of something, new.

Still playing for your pocket change,
Joshua Lodge.

 

 

 

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About Joshua Lodge

Josh will cheerfully admit that he averaged less than a dozen people a show when he first began playing San Diego coffee houses and clubs. But he garnered diehard fans in the process, sold a few thousand copies of his EP, Pocket Change, and picked up few awards along the way. After a traumatic family incident Josh retreated inward, and he ended up writing what would ultimately become his breakout debut, Raw. The album was true to its name and people noticed - Josh picked up two San Diego Music Awards for "Best Acoustic" and "Best Local Recording," opened for the likes of Zac Brown, Jason Mraz, and Matt Nathanson, and had enough money and momentum to tour the country a few times over. A few years after Raw, there was his third EP, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Josh spent much of the year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his album I Will Be There out now on Randm Records. From the joyous encouragement of “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all. A few years after Raw, there was his third release, Hope. Whereas Raw was a mostly acoustic, vulnerable affair, Hope was a celebration. Pleading and poignant, heartfelt and heavy hearted, it segued effortlessly from orchestral to alt-country, eventually landing him in the top 25 on the country charts. One of the hardest working indie singer/songwriters in Southern California, Damigo spent much of year with producer Mike Butler, gathering up some of the finest musicians in town, shaping his songs and sound further still for his latest album, "Just Give Me a Call", available now, on Randm Records. From the up-tempo single, “Just Give Me a Call”, to the simple sincerity of the ballad “Tennessee”, Josh’s songwriting skills are clear, his voice rings true and his goals remain the same as when he started - to keep making the best music he can, and to share it with all.
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2 Responses to Goodbye, Josh Damigo

  1. insideourfoxden says:

    Sometimes the hardest thing to do is the right thing to do. This isn’t a battle you asked for, and you made it through. Best wishes to you as you move forward with your music….you have and will make many fans proud.

  2. Robin says:

    Love you Bro and praying for you. And to quote one of my favorite singers. There is hope [maybe one day we can sing it together lol]. You don’t know how that song has gotten me though these past few weeks. Stay encouraged and know the Lemon family will continue to lift you, your brother, and whole family up in prayer.

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